Summer Sports



ARCHERY

Archery is truly a historic sport – a contest of mind and body control, as well as precision – and has roots dating back to its use as a weapon of hunting and war in ancient times.
Olympic Archers shoot at a target measuring just 122 from a distance of 70 metres. To achieve maximum marks they must hit the gold centre ring measuring just 12.2cm.

Read more [+]




ATHLETICS

The Olympic competition schedule consists of 47 events; 24 for men and 23 for women.
Athletics is an exclusive collection of sporting events that involve competitive running, jumping, throwing, and walking. The most common types of athletics competitions are track and field, road running, cross country running, and race walking.

Read more [+]


BADMINTON

Badminton is the world’s fastest racquet sport where players compete to hit a shuttlecock back and forth over a high net. The record for the fastest smash currently stands at an amazing 421 kph.
As a result, the players have to have lightning-fast reactions and incredible agility and stamina, often covering up to six kilometres in a match as they dart back and forth across the indoor courts.

Read more [+]




BASKETBALL

Basketball is played by two teams, made up of five players and seven substitutes. The aim of the game for each team is to get the ball into the elevated baskets at either end of the court more times than the opposition, while preventing the opposition from scoring at the same time.

Read more [+]




BEACHVALLEYBALL

Beach volleyball is the outdoor equivalent of volleyball and – despite its glamorous, sun-kissed image – is every bit as grueling as its indoor counterpart.
Although beach volleyball is not always played on an actual beach, the deep sand base used for the court provides little grip, but is a soft surface for landings. This means that games can get incredibly physical as players dive to catch shots without the risk of serious injury that a hard floor would cause.

Read more [+]




BOXING

Basketball is played by two teams, made up of five players and seven substitutes. The aim of the game for each team is to get the ball into the elevated baskets at either end of the court more times than the opposition, while preventing the opposition from scoring at the same time.

Read more [+]




CANOE SLALOM

Canoe Slalom competitions consist of timed runs down a white water course with up to 25 gates. Red gates must be negotiated upstream, while green gates must be negotiated downstream.

Touching a gate adds a two-second time penalty to the run; missing a gate results in a 50-second penalty. The time taken to run the course in seconds is added to any penalties to give the overall score.

Read more [+]




CANOE SPRINT

Canoe Sprint events are head-to-head races conducted on still water, as opposed to the white-water time trials of the Canoe Slalom competition. In canoes, athletes race single (men’s C1) or in pairs (men’s C2). In kayaks, athletes race either single (men’s K1 and women’s K1), in pairs (men’s K2 and women’s K2) or in fours (men’s K4 and women’s K4).

Read more [+]




Cycling BMX

Bicycle moto cross (BMX) has caught the spirit of a generation as BMX bikes swept across Europe and the USA. As part of the extreme sports hungry generation, BMX has exploded and from small beginnings become a huge sport.

On 29 June 2003, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) decided to include BMX in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. Based on Moto-Cross, BMX races have thrills and excitement aplenty as riders cut in and leap through the air as they race around a circuit of around 350 metres.

Read more [+]




Cycling Mountain Bike

Mountain biking covers three different disciplines, Downhill, Four Cross and Cross Country/Marathon. For the Olympics the only event that is included is Cross-country.
The key to Cross-country success is fitness as well as great skill. The riders all start together and race over a course with each lap between three and six kilometres. The course is marked and covers a wide variety of terrain with constant changes of elevation and difficulty.

Read more [+]




Cycling Road

Road racing is the form of competitive cycling most analogous to that done by the general public, with riders competing against each other on conventional roads to complete the course in the fastest time possible.
It has been part of the modern Olympics since the inaugural Summer Games in Athens, Greece in 1896. That year, competitors rode for two laps of the marathon route from Athens to Marathon and back – a distance of 87 kilometres.

Read more [+]




Cycling Track

In comparison to road racing and mountain biking, track cycling is an incredibly specialised indoor event, with a number of disciplines that place as much emphasis on strategy and subtle technique as on physical fitness, power and stamina.
Races take place on an indoor velodrome – a 250m wooden oval, with straights banked at 12 degrees and the corners banked at a steep 42 degree angle. The bikes and equipment used by the riders are also highly specialised, and bear little semblance to road-going machinery.

Read more [+]




Diving

Diving is an incredibly specialised aquatic discipline in which athletes leap from platforms or springboards elevated to a height of three metres and 10 metres above the pool. It requires physical poise and great courage.
During their fall, they do a number of spins, flips and twists before hitting the water at speeds of up to 55kph.
To get started in diving, head down to your local pool. If you want to know more about clubs, facilities and coaching schemes in your area, please visit British Swimming.

Read more [+]




Equestrian Dressage

Dressage is the basis for all equestrian sport where the ultimate training of horse and rider results in a picture of harmony, athleticism and partnership. Horse and rider perform a test of movements which is judged on quality, precision and submission. The horse’s three basic paces of walk, trot and canter are developed to produce movements including circles, serpentines, piaffe, passage and pirouettes.
Dressage is often compared to ballet, due to the skill and mastery it requires from both rider and horse in order to execute all exercises.

Read more [+]




Equestrian Eventing

The Equestrian disciplines are unique among Olympic sports, in the sense that men and women compete on the same terms and horse and rider are both declared Olympic medal winners.
Eventing is a combination of Dressage, Jumping and Cross-Country tests which are carried out over 4 consecutive days.

Read more [+]




Equestrian Jumping

The Equestrian disciplines are unique among Olympic sports, in the sense that men and women compete on the same terms and horse and rider are both declared Olympic medal winners.
At Olympic Games, the horses must be the same nationality as the riders and each horse must be at least seven years old and have (as well as the rider) a certificate indicating experience in top international competition.

Read more [+]




Fencing

Fencing is a combat sport using three blade weapons: foil, sabre and epee. It is one of only four sports that have featured at every modern Olympic Games. Fencing calls for a combination of excellent footwork and fast and accurate bladework.

Read more [+]




Football

Modern football has evolved from a game played in streets and schools in the mid 1800s to the most widely played game on earth played in almost every town and village in the world, from youngsters kicking a ball about in the streets and local league teams playing for local honour to vast stadiums where the multi million pound clubs draw up to 100,000 fans each week.

Read more [+]




Golf

Golf is a sport now played in almost every country in the world with an estimated 80 million participants are now enjoying the opportunities of playing on 40,000 plus courses worldwide.
Golf has only ever twice appeared on the schedule at the Olympic Games – in 1900 and 1904, and will make its return at Rio 2016 after a 112-year absence. The Golf event is scheduled to be held in August at a new course to be built in the Reserva de Marapendi in the Barra da Tijuca zone.

Read more [+]




Gymnastics

The Olympic competition schedule consists of 47 events; 24 for men and 23 for women.
Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of exercises requiring physical strength, flexibility, power, agility, coordination, grace, balance and control. Internationally, all events are governed by the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique (FIG). Each country has its own national governing body (BIW) affiliated to FIG. Competitive artistic gymnastics is the best known of the gymnastic events. It typically involves the women’s events of vault, uneven bars, balance beam, and floor exercise. Men’s events are floor exercise, pommel horse, still rings, vault, parallel bars and the high bar.


Read more [+]



Gymnastics Artistic

Artistic Gymnastics is one of the most popular disciplines of the Olympic Games and at the same time one of the most demanding, since it combines strength, skill and flexibility.
Men participate in six apparatus: Floor Exercises, Pommel Horse, Rings, Vault, Parallel Bars and Horizontal Bar. Women participate in four apparatus: Vault, Uneven Bars, Balance Beam and Floor Exercises.

Read more [+]




Gymnastics Rhythmic

Rhythmic Gymnastics is performed exclusively by women and is a combination of gymnastics and dance. The gymnasts perform choreographed movements with musical accompaniment using hand apparatus such as Rope, Hoop, Ball, Clubs and a Ribbon.
Disciplines include Individual and Group competition.

Read more [+]




Gymnastics Trampoline

Gymnastics has been a part of life for thousands of years but trampolining has been a more recent addition to the sport. As with the rest of Gymnastics it requires a high level of strength, technique and flexibility.
Gymnasts perform a series of routines which include 10 bounces, judge’s marks in three different areas difficulty, execution and flight time.

Read more [+]




Handball

Handball is played in an indoor court between two teams, of seven players each. The players’ objective is, by only using their hands, to throw the ball into the goal of the opposing team, thereby scoring a “goal”. The team with the most goals at the end of the match wins.

Read more [+]




Hockey

A game consists of two 35-minute periods, with a 10 minute interval for half-time.

There are 12 teams of 16 players which are placed into two pools of six for the preliminary rounds. Each team plays every other team in that pool. The top two teams in each pool progress to the semifinals. The remaining teams play for classification 5-12. Winners of the semifinals play for the gold medal, and losers of the semifinal play for the bronze.

Read more [+]




Judo

Although Judo is a martial art, its practice and methods are based around gentleness. Giving way to the strength of the opponent, adapting to and using it to your advantage will achieve victory over the opponent.

Read more [+]




Modern Pentathlon

The combination of five completely different sports constitutes Modern Pentathlon, the most demanding sport of the Olympic Games. Pentathletes compete in the course of one day, in the following five disciplines: Fencing, Swimming, Riding, and then combined Shooting and Cross-country running. Modern Pentathlon men and women athletes need to have strength, endurance, quick reflexes and concentration, in order to meet the high demands of the sport.

Read more [+]




Rowing

Rowing is one of Britain’s most successful Olympic sports winning 24 gold, 20 silver and 10 bronze medals in the history of the Olympic Games up to and including Beijing in 2008.

It is the only GB sport to have won gold at every Games since 1984 and boasts Britain’s greatest Olympian, Sir Steve Redgrave who won five Olympic gold medals across five successive Games between 1984 and 2000.

Read more [+]




Sailing

Sailing competition is run in different classes, or types of boats. In any race, only boats of the same class compete against each other.

The 10 classes of boats used in the 2012 Olympic Games are single-handed, double-handed or triple-handed disciplines. The International Sailing Federation selects the classes for each Olympic Games and the classes do, and have, changed over the years.

Read more [+]




Shooting

A sport that demands exceptional concentration and a strong mental approach.
Olympic shooting events are split into three categories: Shotgun, Pistol and Rifle.

Read more [+]




Swimming

Swimming is a hugely physical and demanding sport, with athletes competing over distances from 50m to 1,500m in the pool. Swimmers need huge strength and stamina to power themselves through the water, as well as perfectly honed technique.
The best place to start swimming is at your local pool. You can search for the one closest to you at Active Places. If you want to know more about clubs, facilities and coaching schemes in your area, visit British Swimming

Read more [+]




Synchronised Swimming

Synchronised swimming is often described as ‘water ballet’, because of the dance-like movements swimmers make to music, and its theatrical character. Even though it looks like one of the easier Olympic disciplines, synchronised swimming actually calls for strength, endurance, flexibility, grace, artistry, and special endurance breathing techniques.
To get started in synchronised swimming or if you want to know more about clubs, facilities and coaching schemes in your area, contact British Swimming.

Read more [+]




Table Tennis

There are four table tennis competitions: men’s and women’s singles, and men’s and women’s team event at the Olympics.
All events follow a knockout (single elimination) format. For both singles competitions each match consists of the best four out seven games to at least 11 points, where the winner must win by at least two points.

Read more [+]




Taekwondo

A Korean form of martial art, which has been the dominant form of martial art in that country since 1955.
Each of the eight weight categories involves a single elimination tournament with a double repechage for the bronze medal contest. This means that, for an athlete to make it to the gold medal match, he or she must have progressed through the preliminary rounds undefeated; whereas the bronze medal match will be between two players who have each lost one contest.

Read more [+]




Tennis

A sport that has been around since the Middle Ages, Tennis is a raquet and ball game that can be played either in singles or doubles over five sets (for men) or three sets (for women).
Tennis has evolved into a truly high profile international sport with the top players some of the highest profile sportsman and women in the world earning millions of pound in prize money. In the Olympics however, they play only for medals, like every other athlete.

Read more [+]




Triathalon

Read more [+]




Triathlon

Triathlon pushes competitors to the limits in three different sports: Swimming, cycling & running. Each sport requires the competitor to be in peak physical condition.
The Olympic distance triathlon consists of a 1500m swimming, 40km cycling and 10km running; all completed consecutively. For the women, this will take around two hours, the men will be about ten minutes faster.

Read more [+]




Volleyball

Traditional six-a-side indoor volleyball is referred to at the Olympic Games as volleyball. So the Olympic sport of volleyball has two disciplines – beach volleyball and volleyball. Both disciplines follow the same basic skills, and the flow of play follows similar lines: one team serves, the other tries to win the rally – or ‘side-out’ – with a pattern of dig, set, spike within the requisite three touches.

Read more [+]




Water Polo

Water polo is a highly physical team sport in which the players of each squad try to score as many goals against the opposition as they can, while preventing their rivals from scoring goals at the same time. It requires fast reactions and finesse as well as great endurance, as players can swim up to 1500m in a match.

Read more [+]




Weightlifting

A sport about technique every bit as it is about pure strength. Weightlifting has been around as long as competition itself.
Weightlifting consists of two movements executed in a standard order: first the snatch and then the clean jerk. There are both men and women Weightlifting events. Each athlete has the right to three attempts for each movement. The athlete’s best performances in both movements are put together to determine the final placement.

Read more [+]




Wrestling

Wrestling is a combat sport involving grappling type techniques such as clinch fighting, throws and takedowns, joint locks, pins and other grappling holds. A wrestling bout is a physical competition, between two (occasionally more) competitors or sparring partners, who attempt to gain and maintain a superior position. There are a wide range of styles with varying rules with both traditional historic and modern styles. Wrestling techniques have been incorporated into other martial arts as well as military hand-to-hand combat systems.

Read more [+]




Wrestling Freestyle

A sport as old as mankind itself. Since the dawn of time men have been pitted against each other in physical hand to hand combat, making this almost certainly the most ancient of Olympic sports.
It’s a simple concept. Two men or women fight until one of them is subdued. But the techniques of wresting have become sophisticated and winning is about having the ability to use not only your weight and skill but also the weight of your opponent.

Read more [+]




Wrestling Greco Roman

A sport as old as mankind itself. Since the dawn of time men have been pitted against each other in physical hand-to-hand combat, making this almost certainly the most ancient of Olympic sports.
It’s a simple concept. Two men fight until one of them is subdued. But the techniques of wresting have become sophisticated and winning is about having the ability to use not only your weight and skill but also the weight of your opponent.

Read more [+]